Children's author Caroline Hatton
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Books Translated by Caroline Hatton



As a translator, I translate written words (interpreters translate verbally).

Why:

  • because when my big brother and I were teens growing up in Paris, we learned English in school and thought it would be exciting to do translation
  • because I want French to be a part of my professional life
  • and because translation disseminates ideas that might help others.

How I got my first translation job:

I told everyone I knew in France that I was seeking translation work. A friend put me in touch with her colleague, a French professor of pharmacy, who happened to be discussing with his publisher the translation of his 900-page textbook into English.


Pharmacognosy - Phytochemistry
- Medicinal Plants

by Jean Bruneton
Lavoisier, Paris 1995
915 pages
translated from the French by
Caroline K Hatton, Ph.D

Pharmacognosy - Phytochemistry
- Medicinal Plants - Second Edition
by Jean Bruneton
Lavoisier, Paris 1999
1136 pages
translated from the French by
Caroline K. Hatton, Ph.D


Click here: LAVOISIER


Toxic Plants - Dangerous to Humans and Animals
by Jean Bruneton
Lavoisier, Paris 1999
560 pages
translated from the French by
Caroline K Hatton, Ph.D.

Biopesticides of Plant Origin
Eds. Catherine Regnault-Roger, Bernard JR Philogéne & Charles Vincent
Lavoisier, Paris 2005
310 pages
3 chapters translated from the French
by Caroline K. Hatton, Ph.D
Click here: LAVOISIER
Click here: LAVOISIER



Need a Translator?



Book TranslationCommon advice for those who hire a translator is to make sure he or she will translate INTO his or her native Translation Revisionslanguage—to avoid embarrassing goofs. As the exception that proves the rule, I translate scientific and technical material from my first language, French, into English. I deliver fine products because I live immersed in English, in the U.S. where references in English are readily accessible. My writing seems good enough compared to the international language of science—broken English! I have co-authored 28 scientific articles and encyclopedia chapters, and received the Society for Technical Communication Excellence Award twice.


Career Advice:



Doing translation works best for those who love reading, writing, the relevant languages, and communication, who naturally pay meticulous attention to detail, and who have a deep interest in the subject matter. Professional training and accreditations exist. I have neither—I just do it!